Rose GardenThere are many ways I like to relax, but one of my favorites is gardening.  There is nothing more calming than being outdoors and nothing more rewarding than being a part of a gardens beauty and growth.  Earlier this year, I had the pleasure of meeting a garden guru named Bob, or “The Plant Whisperer” as I call him.   Bob has visited me and my plants a few times to lend his expertise –his last visit being just a few weeks ago to help with the fall pruning.  Below are some of his tips I thought I would share–basically my cheat sheet to help me throughout the year.  Happy gardening…

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Autumn…

Fertilize when the leaves start to fall.  You want to send the nutrients and energy to the roots, not the old leaves.

  • Organic Holly-Tone for Hydrangea and any Evergreens
  • Organic Plant-Tone on Rose Bushes, Trees, Crape Myrtles and Butterfly Bushes

Prune only when leaves start to fall or turn brown.

  • Hydrangea – cut off 20% of drooping and old growth.  No need to cut flowers – they give you’re garden a pretty look in fall and eventually most will blow away with the winter wind.
  • Sea Grass & Blue Salvia –  should be cut down entirely to the ground.
  • Roses –  cut back to 12” to 18”
  • Crape Myrtles – don’t prune unless its branches are horizontal and susceptible to breaking and splitting from the weight of ice and snow.

Spring…

  • In Spring & Summer fertilize flowers once a month. 
  • Hydrangea – cut off any remaining flowers in early spring.
  • Lilac Tree – prune branches only after it flowers
  • Release Praying Mantis eggs & Lady Bugs in the yard to help control pests and keep eco-systems naturally balanced.

 Gardening Notes:

  • An upright flower with yellow leaves means it needs food.
  • A drooping flower or leaf means it needs water
  • Water less often and deeply.  1” of water twice a week.
  • Always cut back at the point of new growth.
  • Cutting back branches that are lying on the ground or against the house just redirect the energy to the places where you want it to grow.
  • Too much mulch chokes a plant and doesn’t allow oxygen to its roots.  It also allows a place for slugs and mice to hide while they eat the soft bark.
  • Water when the sun comes up to prevent fungus on leaves and grass.
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